Publishing Opportunities

Publishing Opportunities

We are pleased to announce that we have got approval to publish special issues with the following journals:


Call for papers

Special Issue for Media International Australia“Governing China’s Internet and Digital Media: Domestic Issues and Global Responses”

The governance of China’s internet and digital media is one of the most studied topics in the field of Chinese internet/digital media studies. The topic has become more urgent and crucial for scholarly inquiry since the last decade with an escalating ‘civilising process’ of the internet and digital media in China, as well as the global expansion of Chinese digital media and China’s proactive promotion of its perspective on global internet governance. 

Domestically, we have seen the implementation of increasing regulatory laws and provisions, such as Cybersecurity Law (2017), Provisions on the Governance of the Online Information Content Ecosystem (2020) and Provisions on the Management of Internet User Public Account Information Services (2021), aiming to ‘clean up’ the cyberspace and maintain China’s cybersecurity. In the meantime, we have witnessed growing alliance between official regulatory agencies and digital platforms to govern emerging digital practices, cultures and economies, such as online live streaming, algorithmic distribution of news, wanghong e-commerce, fandom fake data and etc. Moreover, the government has initiated nationwide campaigns to promote digital literacy and cybersecurity education among young people, unite and educate ‘new media professionals’ (e.g. wanghong, online public opinion leaders, ‘self-media’ entrepreneurs, CEOs of internet companies) through the ‘United Front’ work, aiming to enhance the self-discipline and self-governance of internet users, content producers and digital business owners. 

Internationally, China’s global promotion of its vision for global internet governance and the concept of ‘cyber sovereignty’ through the annual World Internet Conference organised by the Chinese government since 2014 and elsewhere has caused an ongoing debate on China’s striving for leadership in a new world cyber order. In the meantime, the global expansion of China’s digital infrastructure through the Digital Silk Road Initiative as well as ‘going global’ of Chinese digital technologies (e.g. 5G and facial recognition technology) and digital platforms (e.g. Tik Tok and WeChat) have provoked global ‘Sino techlash’, such as the ban of Huawei 5G, ban of Chinese apps in India, Trump’s executive order to ban Tik Tok, among others. 

The special issue explores emerging governance issues of China’s internet and digital media from both domestic and global perspectives. It aims to provide an up-to-date, critical and complex understanding of the governance of China’s internet and digital media by considering the roles of multiple players involved in the governing process and their relations, interplays and mutual adaptations, including ordinary users, content producers, digital entrepreneurs, digital platforms/companies, non-governmental organisations, official regulatory agencies in China, foreign governments and relevant regulatory authorities overseas. The collection will contribute not only to the scholarship of China’s digital policies, politics, culture and economy with a particular focus on the governance issue, but also to the studies of global internet governance, digital diplomacy and digital capitalism by examining cases that involve Chinese technological platforms, hardware and software, standards, and discourses. We would like to invite articles that address various governance issues of China’s internet and digital media with qualitative, quantitative or mixed approach and across disciplines. We welcome submissions on but not limited to the following topics:

  • Governance of short-video and live-streaming platforms (e.g. Douyin, Kuaishou)
  • Governance of dating apps (e.g. Momo, Tantan, Blued)
  • Governance of news aggregation apps (e.g. Toutiao)
  • Governance of ‘self-media’ accounts (e.g. Weixin public accounts, Weibo accounts)
  • Governance of wanghong (influencers) and wanghong economy (e.g. live-streaming e-commerce)
  • Governance of online rumor and fake news
  • Cyberspace Administration of China and internet governance
  • Non-governmental organisations and internet governance (e.g. Internet Society of China)
  • Internet philanthropy as alternative internet governance
  • Big data, privacy and information governance
  • Digital literacy and cybersecurity education campaigns among youths
  • Industry of online public opinion analysis 
  • ‘United Front’ work and internet governance 
  • Chinese visions for global internet governance and ‘cyber sovereignty’ and their global debate
  • Governance of China’s outbound digital platforms and technologies
  • Global geopolitics and ‘Sino techlash’
  • Politics of the World Internet Conference
  • Politics of China’s Digital Silk Road Initiative
  • Comparative study of China’s internet governance with other nations
  • Theorise internet governance with the Chinese characteristics

Timeline

30 July 2021: Abstracts (400-500 words) submitted to guest editors

20 August 2021: Invitation to submit full papers sent to selected authors

20 December 2021: Full paper submission

20 March 2022: Peer review reports sent to authors

20 May 2022: Final paper submission to MIA; with introduction to the special issue

Edited by:  

Jian Xu, Senior Lecturer in Communication, Deakin University, Australia; j.xu@deakin.edu.au 

Haiqing Yu, Professor of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Australia; haiqing.yu@rmit.edu.au

Note: This special issue will target papers to be presented at the 18th Chinese Internet Research Conference (CIRC), 25-27 June 2021. The call-for-paper process will be both targeted (among CIRC participants) and open to the broader academic community among established and emerging scholars.


Call for papers

Special issue for Global Media and China“Platformisation and entrepreneurial labour via Chinese digital networks”

This special issue, “Platformisation and entrepreneurial labour via Chinese digital networks,” examines entrepreneurial labour and its relationship with the platformisation of Chinese society and economy. As a key feature of our digital economy and lifestyle, powerful digital platforms have transformed how cultural production is carried forward, how services are delivered, how businesses are established, how talents are identified and developed, and how new forms of entrepreneurial activities are regulated and governed. While platformisation has technological, infrastructural, and economic dimensions, its human dimension highlights individual agency and limitations in the platformisation process. We call for papers that examine individuals and groups who have demonstrated the entrepreneurial spirit, skills, and thinking in taking advantage of Chinese digital networks, systems and platforms to reinvent themselves, change lives, and influence others and society. 

The entrepreneurial individuals and groups include: new media professionals (e.g. wanghong and self-media content producers); platform managers, engineers, and programmers; e-commerce and social commerce operators, agents, and co-ops; product and service brokers, intermediaries, and consultants; government officials and agencies in managing digital and social media platforms, networks, and R&D.

This special issue will provide a new perspective on digital culture, digital economy, and platform studies by focusing on “entrepreneurial” labour, in order to highlight the importance of human agency and creativity, as individuals and communities navigate changes and disruptions in their everyday life brought about by digital platforms and the platformisation of cultural, economic, and knowledge production. 

We welcome abstracts and papers from a wide range of disciplines and interests, including but not limited to: social studies of science and technology, digital media and communication studies, information systems, platform studies, digital humanities, digital anthropology, and digital China studies in general.

Timeline:

30 July 2021: Abstracts (400-500 words) submitted to guest editors

20 August 2021: Invitation to submit full papers sent to selected authors

20 December 2021: Full paper submission

20 March 2022: Peer review reports sent to authors

20 May 2022: Final paper submission to GMC; with introduction to the special issue

Edited by:

Haiqing Yu, Professor of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Australia; haiqing.yu@rmit.edu.au

Jian Xu, Senior Lecturer in Communication, Deakin University, Australia; j.xu@deakin.edu.au 

Ping Sun, Assistant Professor in Journalism and Communication, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China; sophiesunping@gmail.com 

Note: This special issue will target papers to be presented at the 18th Chinese Internet Research Conference (CIRC), 25-27 June 2021. The call-for-paper process will be both targeted (among CIRC participants) and open to the broader academic community among established and emerging scholars.

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